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Music fans worldwide believe human creativity essential in time of AI



Attitudes towards AI revealed for the first time in largest global study of its kind 

~ 79% feel human creativity remains essential to the creation of music

~ 76% feel that an artist's music or vocals should not be used or ingested by AI without permission

~ 74% agree that AI should not be used to clone or impersonate artists without authorisation 

  

Today, IFPI, representing the recording industry worldwide, has shared findings on attitudes to artificial intelligence from the biggest study of music fans in the world.

The research comes from the forthcoming Engaging with Music 2023, IFPI's global report examining how fans around the world engage with, and feel about, music. With responses from more than 43,000 people across 26 countries, the report is the largest music study of its kind and the most detailed insight into fan thinking.

This year, for the first time, the report includes a section dedicated to artificial intelligence (AI) as the technology's rapid advancement continues to present both opportunities and challenges for the music business and for artists.  What is clear is that fans deeply value authenticity – nearly-eight-in-ten music fans (79%) feel human creativity remains essential to the creation of music.

For fans aware of generative AI's ability to take and copy existing artists' repertoire, authorisation for the use of any artist's music is seen as absolutely non-negotiable: 76% feel that an artist's music or vocals should not be used or ingested by AI without permission. Further, 74% agree that AI should not be used to clone or impersonate artists without authorisation.  The vast majority of fans also support the need for transparency, as 73% agree that an AI system should clearly list any music that it has used.

Frances Moore, IFPI's Chief Executive, said: "While music fans around the world see both opportunities and threats for music from artificial intelligence, their message is clear: authenticity matters. In particular, fans believe that AI systems should only use music if pre-approved permission is obtained and that they should be transparent about the material ingested by their systems. These are timely reminders for policymakers as they consider how to implement standards for responsible and safe AI.

The Engaging with Music 2023 report findings on AI include:

  • There is already good awareness of AI among music fans, with many using it and interested in its capabilities. 

 

89% are aware of AI 

  • Nearly eight-in-ten music fans (79%) feel human creativity remains essential to the creation of music. 

 

For fans aware of AI's capabilities:  

  • Authorisation for the use of music is seen as extremely important:  

76% feel that an artist's music or vocals should not be used or ingested by AI without permission  

74% agree that AI should not be used to clone or impersonate artists without authorisation  

 

  • The vast majority of fans also support the need for transparency, with:  

73% agreeing that an AI system should clearly list any music that it has ingested or used for training  

 

  • Fans also recognise the need to set rules for AI systems: 

70% agree there should be restrictions on what AI can do  

64% say governments should play a role in setting restrictions in what AI can do.


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Key among the IFPI highlights is that music fans value transparency and human authenticity in the age of AI-generated music – with nearly 4 in every 5 (79%) believing that human creativity is essential to music, while close to three quarters (73%) agree that an AI system should clearly list any music that it has ingested or used for training. 

The IFPI data (not published but seen by BPI) also include the perspective of UK consumers, which shows that alongside France, the UK has the highest percentage (81%) of music fans who agree that AI should not be used to clone or impersonate artists without authorisation.  The UK also has the greatest proportion (89%) of music fans who agree that music generated solely by AI should be clearly labelled. 

Responding to the IFPI findings, Dr. Jo Twist OBE, BPI Chief Executive said:
"At a time of heightened discussion around AI – the opportunities this exciting tech presents, but also the fundamental challenges if the wrong policy decisions are taken now – these data are highly timely in highlighting the extent to which music fans, especially those in the UK, are fully aligned with artists and rightsholders in believing that human artistry must remain at the heart of the creative process." 

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